The Yuzu Jasmine Sour

Made with gin and Japanese shochu, this citrus-y yuzu flip has hints of jasmine tea and is just refreshing enough for a January reset.
By Annelise McAuliffe

The Yuzu Jasmine SourAndreas Argirakis

Have you ever had the Japanese spirit, shochu? If not, it’s time to give it a try! Made from barley, sweet potato, rice, or buckwheat, depending on the region, shoschu is a refreshingly smooth spirit. We created a cocktail with a Japanese barley shochu that has been mixed with yuzu fruit juice. Yuzu is an East Asian citrus fruit that is perfect for giving your cocktails that much needed zing.

Because it comes already mixed, iichiko’s BAR YUZU shochu liqueur is ready to mix into any drink you please. It comes in at 8% alcohol by volume, so you can serve simply on ice perhaps with a splash of soda water or mix into cocktails with another spirit. With some natural sweetness, this yuzu shochu liquer bring a sweet-citrus combo to a cocktail. When we created this sour, we chose to add only a small amount of sweetener, but feel free to try without.

The Yuzu Jasmine Sour

As we look for lighter, fresh cocktails in the new year, this iichiko’s yuzu liqueur really is a bartender’s delicious cheat. Plus, because shochu naturally contains less acetaldehyde—the pesky chemical that causes hangovers—than most spirits you can enjoy a glass without worrying about hurting later.

The Yuzu Jasmine Sour
 
Made with gin and Japanese shochu, this citrus-y yuzu flip has hints of jasmine tea and is just refreshing enough for a January reset.
Recipe Type: Cocktail
Cuisine: Japanese Inspired
Serves: 1 cocktail
Ingredients
  • 2 parts iichiko's BAR YUZU schochu liqueur
  • 1 part Jasmine tea (strongly brewed, chilled)
  • 1 part Gin
  • ½ part Simple syrup or honey (optional, taste and add as you you like)
  • 1 part Yuzu juice or lime juice
  • 1 Egg white
Instructions
  1. Shake all ingredients, except the egg white together with ice.
  2. Strain and shake until frothy with the egg white.
  3. Serve in a glass and garnish with yuzu or lime zest, if desired.

 

Annelise McAuliffe

Annelise McAuliffe

Mandatory family outings to the Detroit farmers' market and nightly home-cooked meals cultivated Annelise's respect and curiosity for food. A graduate of The Culinary Institute of America, she spends her free time in New York City recipe testing, eating breakfast all day, and dreaming up international culinary adventures.

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2 Comments
  1. Hi there! Where were you able to buy the Yuzu Liqueur Bar Fruits? I’m on the hunt and am not able to find a local seller (Northern California).

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