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Swedish Wallenbergare Recipe

A veal burger named after the forefather of the largest industrial family in Sweden, and a true delicacy with its proud but velvety smooth flavors.
By Kalle Bergman – Photo by Mads Damgaard

Wallenbergare Recipe

Swedish Wallenbergare Recipe
 
Prep Time
Cook Time
Total Time
 
A veal burger named after the forefather of the largest industrial family in Sweden, and a true delicacy with its velvety smooth flavors.
Author:
Recipe Type: Main Course
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 lb of Ground veal
  • 1 Teaspoon of salt
  • ½ Teaspoon of white pepper
  • 4 Egg yolks from free range eggs
  • 1 Cup of heavy cream
  • 3 Tablespoons of breadcrumbs
  • Organic butter and vegetable oil for frying
  • 4 Oz of frozen green peas
  • Lingonberry Jam or Red Currant Jam for serving
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, place veal, salt, white pepper and beat in the egg yolks one at the time. Then blend in the heavy cream while stirring with a wooden spoon. Make sure the mixture is completely smooth.
  2. Shape into rather thick burgers and chill in the fridge for about a 1 hour. Heat the butter and oil in a saute pan. Take the burgers, coat them with the bread crumbs and fry gently for 4 minutes on each side, or until just cooked.
  3. Blanch the green peas for 45 seconds in lightly salted boiling water.
  4. Arrange all ingredients on a plate and drizzle a little melted butter over the peas.
  5. Serve with Lingonberry Jam or Red Currant Jam, and mashed potatoes.
Kalle Bergman

Kalle Bergman

Kalle Bergman is the Editor In Chief at Honest Cooking. He has a lifelong obsession with simple and honest food, and he spreads the gospel wherever he can. His writing has been featured regularly in Gourmet, Los Angeles Times, Serious Eats and The Huffington Post.

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Originally Published: December 14, 2012

2 Responses to Swedish Wallenbergare Recipe

  1. Adam Frisch Reply

    April 2, 2014 at 11:36 am

    A true Swedish classic from my childhood. When I grew up, this was luxury food that you got treated to at a restaurant maybe once or twice a year. Spread the gospel – this dish belongs in every bistro in the world. It’s that good.

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