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Sweet Corn Chicken Soup

This comforting and customizable soup is a staple in Indian-Chinese cuisine.
By Amrita Rawat
Sweet Corn Chicken Soup
Chinese food means different things to different countries. Growing up in India, I was witness to a whole different cuisine called Indian-Chinese food. It consists, among many other things, of noodles cooked in Indian spices, American chopsuey which is a sticky sweet coating on noodles buried under a fried egg (my favorite), and chili paneer, which really isn’t Chinese whatsoever. But that is what a lot of Indians think of when they think of Chinese food (they also make it all ridiculously spicy).

When I moved to the US and ate American-Chinese, it consisted mostly of lo-mein, General Tsao’s chicken, and egg rolls.
And of course, when I finally visited China, it was none of those things, although all the variations are delicious in their own right.

Sweet corn chicken soup is a staple in Indian-Chinese cuisine. It’s similar to an egg drop soup but with sweet corn stirred in. It’s scrumptious, with the corn adding the perfect texture and sweetness to the rest of the flavor. They often give you the option of stirring in soy sauce and/or vinegar yourself. Although this soup isn’t as common in the US, my mother luckily learned to make it for us at home.

When it’s a gorgeously rainy day (or perhaps just ominous), this soup is perfect for eating and staring wistfully out the window. When you’re feeling sick from a cold, cough, fever, or a broken heart, this soup is warm and comforting and lets you know everything will be okay. It’s also great for having on hand when you know you won’t have time to make a meal and are exhausted and starving from a long day.
When any of my loved ones are sick, I bring them this soup and it’s always revitalizing. It’s my way of nurturing my friends, as it was my mother’s way of nurturing me all my life.

My mother would make me this every time I was sick…and eventually, every time I requested it. I love that my niece and nephew enjoy it and ask for it from time to time as well. I hope one day they’ll make it in their college apartment when they’re feeling homesick, or for their own future little ones.

It’s easy to put together and the ingredients are simple enough. If you have lots of leftovers throughout the week, it’s fun to try different variations, like adding in soy sauce and a spot of vinegar, or other vegetables, or serving with some fried crunchy bits.

Over the years I’ve learned many other delicious soup recipes, but I always come back to this one. It’s comforting, remedying, and tastes like home.

Sweet Corn Chicken Soup
 
Prep Time
Cook Time
Total Time
 
This comforting and customizable soup is a staple in Indian-Chinese cuisine.
Author:
Recipe Type: Main
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 3-5 chicken drumsticks (skinless)*
  • 7 cups water**
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 2 cans of sweet corn, cream style
  • 3 TBS cornstarch mixed with ½ cup water/broth**
  • 1 or 2 large eggs
Instructions
  1. Boil chicken in 7 cups of water and salt until the chicken is cooked through.
  2. Remove the chicken pieces and set aside.
  3. Add the sweet corn and bring to a boil.
  4. Lower the fire and mix the cornstarch and water until there are no lumps, and pour into the soup.
  5. Immediately raise the fire and bring to a boil.
  6. This thickens the soup.
  7. Beat the egg in a bowl, then lower the flame and pour into the soup in a dribble, while stirring the pot.
  8. As soon as the egg has been poured stir it once and shut the gas off.
  9. Shred the chicken and put back into the soup.
  10. Add pepper and more salt according to taste.
Amrita Rawat

Amrita Rawat

Amrita Rawat is the author of the blog The Sweet Art. Born in India and a lifelong resident of Atlanta, she recently moved to Saint Louis. Her love for food stems in part from its ability to bring cultures together and in part from how darn good it feels to eat a delicious meal. She loves traveling and has eaten her way through cities like Hong Kong, Paris, Budapest, Mumbai, and Shangri-la. Amrita is also a contributor to Sauce Magazine in St Louis.

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Originally Published: August 14, 2013

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