One Pot of Farro, Five Ways to Eat It

What do you do with a large batch of the farro grain? Here are five of our favorites so you don’t get bored.
By Annelise McAuliffe

shutterstock_148956047

Shutterstock: Marilyn BarboneCooking in larger batches for later saves time, but eating the same thing over and over becomes redundant and loathsome. Common in Italian cuisine, Farro is a specific type of wheat grain that is similar and sometimes synonymous with spelt and einkorn. Versatile like barley, Farro is delicious used in stews, salads, and risotto like dishes.

Next time, make a larger batch of the grain, but use it a couple of different ways. Here are some of our favorites:

Caprese di Farro

California-Love-Caprese-di-Farro-1

Give a shoutout to Italian ingredients and cuisine with this traditional flavor combination. Make the farro ahead so that all you have to do is reheat, mix together the dressing, and stir in the tomatoes, mozzarella, basil. Get the recipe here.

Seafood Stew with Farro

HA_Seafood-with-Farro-635x357

A delicious trio of octopus, clams and shrimp nestled in herbs, white wine, fresh vegetables and farro, created by restaurateur and Chef Hugh Acheson. Make the stew as normal and add in the already made farro at the end. Get the recipe here.

Roasted Acorn Squash with Farro, Mung Beans and Goat Cheese

IMG_3972

Farro is rich in fiber, Magnesium and Vitamins A, B, C and E making this seasonal vegetarian dinner a nutrient powerhouse. Add the pre-cooked farro to the mung beans and finish the salad as usual and fill the squash halves. Get the recipe here.

Hot or Cold Mediterranean Farro salad

MEDITERRANEAN-FARRO-SALAD

Use farro instead of rice in your sides dishes for a nutrient-rich and delicious dish. Balsamic vinegar brings the salad together and wraps around the sweet tomatoes for a perfect finish. This is great as a cold packed lunch or warm right after cooking. Get the recipe here.

Hearty Tuscan Farro Soup

minestra-di-farro-bike-tours-tuscany

There are a lot of ways to adjust this soup to your own taste, to highlight flavors with a Tuscan touch. For a shorter cooking time, use the pre-cooked farro and simmer with the rest of the ingredients. Get the recipe here.

#mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; border: 3px double black; clear:left; font:14px Georgia,serif;  width:635px;}
/* Add your own MailChimp form style overrides in your site stylesheet or in this style block.
  We recommend moving this block and the preceding CSS link to the HEAD of your HTML file. */

Annelise McAuliffe

Annelise McAuliffe

Mandatory family outings to the Detroit farmers' market and nightly home-cooked meals cultivated Annelise's respect and curiosity for food. A graduate of The Culinary Institute of America, she spends her free time in New York City recipe testing, eating breakfast all day, and dreaming up international culinary adventures.

More Posts - Website - Twitter

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>