Refreshing Mango Ice Cream

With a creamy mango curd as its base, this mango ice cream is so rich and refreshing at the same time.

Refreshing Mango Ice Cream

Have you spotted any champagne mangos (also known as ataulfo or honey) in stores recently? They’re my absolute favorite. They’re the smaller, golden-colored mangos, and I find their flavor sweeter and cleaner than their larger, red-skinned counterparts. (I didn’t take a picture of the whole mangos this time, but you can see what they look like in the photos for my stuffed avocados with shrimp and mango.) Their flesh is also less fibrous than other mangos, which makes them an ideal choice for whipping up a smooth curd that will eventually become mango curd ice cream.

Refreshing Mango Ice Cream

Making mango curd is easy, and it’s a wonderful addition to my relatively large collection of fruit curds. I start by pureeing mango chunks to yield the golden nectar you see below (an immersion blender makes cleanup super quick). The mango puree goes into a saucepan with raw sugar, a few egg yolks, a couple spoonfuls of lime juice, a splash of vanilla, and a pinch of salt. Next, I whisk it over medium heat until it’s cooked and thickened a bit. Since the mango puree is so thick to begin with, the change isn’t as dramatic as with other curds, so I like to use a thermometer to keep track. When the temperature is between 150 and 155°F, it’s done. If you don’t have a thermometer, watch for plenty of steam rising from the edges of the pan, but don’t let it actually start to bubble.

Refreshing Mango Ice Cream

Turning the mango curd into the base for mango curd ice cream is the simplest part of all: just whisk in heavy cream! I haven’t tried a dairy-free version of this using full-fat coconut milk, but I bet it would be wonderful. I’ve made similar ice creams with coconut milk in the past before discovering my coconut milk allergy (like this strawberry one) and they always come out great.

Refreshing Mango Ice Cream

Once the mixture has chilled until totally cold (at least four hours–you can’t rush this part!) I churn it in my ice cream maker. I haven’t yet tried a no-churn version, but if you don’t have an ice cream machine, here’s what I’d try. Chill the curd completely (without mixing the cream in). Whip the cream until it holds medium peaks. Gently fold the chilled curd into the whipped cream, spread into a container, and freeze until firm.

This mango curd ice cream is going to be my frozen treat of choice all summer long. I love the balance of sweet, tart, rich, creamy, and fruity flavors. Let me know if you have a chance to give this one a try!

Refreshing Mango Ice Cream
 
Prep Time
Cook Time
Total Time
 
Once the mixture has chilled until totally cold (at least four hours–you can’t rush this part!) I churn it in my ice cream maker. I haven’t yet tried a no-churn version, but if you don’t have an ice cream machine, here’s what I’d try. Chill the curd completely (without mixing the cream in). Whip the cream until it holds medium peaks. Gently fold the chilled curd into the whipped cream, spread into a container, and freeze until firm. This mango curd ice cream is going to be my frozen treat of choice all summer long. I love the balance of sweet, tart, rich, creamy, and fruity flavors. Let me know if you have a chance to give this one a try!
Author:
Recipe Type: Ice cream
Serves: pint
Ingredients
  • 1½ cups fresh mango chunks*
  • ¾ cup raw sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 pinches of sea salt
  • 4 large egg yolks
  • 1¼ cups heavy cream
Instructions
  1. NOTE: Prep time does not include four hours for the ice cream mixture to chill before churning.
  2. Puree the mango chunks with an immersion blender or regular blender until smooth. You should have about 1 cup of mango puree.
  3. Combine the mango puree, raw sugar, lime juice, vanilla, salt, and egg yolks in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Whisk constantly until the curd thickens, about 6-8 minutes (it should measure 150-155°F on a candy thermometer). Remove from the heat and continue to whisk for about 30 seconds more. Strain if desired (I recommend straining the curd if your mangos were at all fibrous—more likely to happen with red mangos).
  4. Whisk in the cream. Refrigerate the mixture until completely chilled (at least 4 hours or up to a day).
  5. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer's instructions (I have this Cuisinart ice cream maker and love it). Serve right away for soft serve, or transfer to a container and freeze for at least 2 hours for scoopable ice cream.
Notes
*You’ll need about three champagne/ataulfo mangos (the small, yellow ones—they’re my favorite but can be hard to find!) or two large red mangos to get the right amount of pulp.

 

Becky Winkler

Becky Winkler

Becky Winkler is an enthusiastic eater who shares paleo and gluten-free recipes on her blog, A Calculated Whisk. She enjoys chopping chocolate, salting dessert, searing short ribs, and taking pictures. In her other life, she's a grad student in Boston.

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