Cumin Chard Chips

If your chard is thicker and tougher, you may need to bake for a bit longer. Just take them out when the leaves are slightly translucent and crisp.
By Rachel Crawford

Cumin Chard Chips

Kale chips are all the rage, so I thought, why not chard chips? I have never once felt it necessary to shell out $7 for a very small, very light package of kale chips. And here’s why: they are stupidly easy to make, and greens from the farmer’s market don’t come in plastic boxes.

My chard was so tender that I didn’t need to remove the stems, but in most cases you will want to do that, and probably cut up the leaves into manageable sizes. Keep in mind that they will shrink a bit in the oven, though.

If your chard is thicker and tougher, you may need to bake for a bit longer. Just take them out when the leaves are slightly translucent and crisp.

Cumin Chard Chips
 
Prep Time
Cook Time
Total Time
 
If your chard is thicker and tougher, you may need to bake for a bit longer. Just take them out when the leaves are slightly translucent and crisp.
Author:
Recipe Type: Side
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • Olive oil
  • Cumin
  • Salt
  • Chard leaves
Instructions
  1. Wash chard leaves and dry well.
  2. Toss with a drizzle of olive oil until lightly coated.
  3. Lay on a baking sheet and sprinkle with salt and cumin.
  4. Bake at 275F for 20 minutes. Flip over and bake for 5 more minutes. Let cool.
  5. Eat.
Rachel Crawford

Rachel Crawford

Rachel is a lover of vegetables and an avid home cook. She has catered parties, participated in cook-offs, hosted elaborate supper clubs, and volunteered with Slow Food teaching elementary school kids about seasonal food and how to cook. Recently, she left her full-time job as a branding consultant to spend more time in the kitchen. Her personal blog, madeweekly.tumblr.com, focuses on one seasonal ingredient every week, with a new recipe each day. She can also be found on kitchensurfing.com, a new site that allows anyone to search for and hire personal chefs online. Rachel studied acting at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, and has lived in New York, NY for almost 12 years, which means she can officially call herself a New Yorker.

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