Bucatini all’amatriciana

Bucatini all’amatriciana is the quintessential Italian classic. Simple, elegant and all around delicious. Perfect.

Bucatini all’amatriciana

Bucatini all’amatriciana is a classic dish that dates back to the time of the Romans. Ironically, there is a debate around whether l’amatriciana even originates in Rome.

Some maintain that it comes from the city of Amatrice, located near the border between Lazio and Abruzzo. There are also variations on its name – some dropping the “a” and simply calling it matriciana, as was the case in Stefano’s childhood home in Rome. Regardless of it’s history, it’s a Roman classic now, on the menu of every traditional osteria and trattoria in the Eternal city.

If you want authentic Bucatini all’amatriciana, then there are a few rules that simply cannot be broken:

  • No onions and no garlic. Don’t you dare. Actually, some do use one or the other, but the original recipe calls for neither.
  • Use guanciale, not pancetta. Guanciale is an Italian cured meat prepared from pork jowl or cheeks. Its name is derived from guancia, Italian for cheek. This is why you don’t need onion or garlic – you get all the flavor you need from the guanciale. Check your local Italian deli for guanciale, or order it online.
  • The only acceptable pasta to accompany l’amatriciana are bucatini, spaghetti or rigatoni. We’re not sure why this is important, but it is. Bucatini are our favorite – a thick spaghetti with a hollow center, known as the buco or hole.
  • Top with pecorino, not parmigiano.

 

 

Bucatini all’amatriciana
 
Bucatini all’amatriciana is the quintessential Italian classic. Simple, elegant and all around delicious. Perfect.
Author:
Recipe Type: Primi
Serves: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • Guanciale
  • Whole canned tomatoes (approx. 1 kg or 28 oz), preferably San Marzano
  • Olive oil
  • Half a glass of dry white wine
  • Red chile pepper flakes
  • Salt
  • One package (approx. 500g or 16 oz.) bucatini. (Or, substitute spaghetti or rigatoni)
  • Pecorino
Instructions
  1. Dice the guanciale into pieces of approximately .5 cm (1/4 inch) thick, 2.5 cm (1 inch) long. Set aside.
  2. Fill a medium size pot with water, and put on heat to bring to a boil.
  3. Pass the canned tomatoes through a food mill to eliminate seeds and pulp. If you don’t have a food mill, blend the tomatoes in a blender to render it smooth and free of chunks.
  4. Add a few tablespoons of olive oil to a large skillet over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, add the guanciale. After a few minutes, add red pepper flakes to taste. When the guanciale takes on a golden brown color, add half a glass of white wine, and let it cook off.
  5. Add the tomatoes, and salt to taste. Let cook for 10-15 minutes until the sauce thickens and takes on a deep red color.
  6. In the meanwhile, when the water boils, toss a handful of salt into the water and add the bucatini. Cook to al dente according to the directions on the package.
  7. When cooked, drain the pasta well, and then add it to the skillet with the sauce. Stir together over low heat. Serve hot with pecorino grated on top.

Cara Quinn & Stefano Follega

Due Spaghetti is our blog on the food, wine and other marvels of Italy. We are Italian expatriates living in the wonderful city of Minneapolis. Our mission is to share our favorite recipes, pairings, and other tips with you, so that you too can have a taste of La Dolce Vita. Ciao! I’m Stefano. I was born and grew up in Rome, where I helped my family tend to our olive groves and make olive oil each year, learned the secrets of homemade cooking from my mother and grandmother, and watched my father and grandfather make wine with grapes grown in the hill towns outside of Rome. Since then, I’ve studied wine formally through the International Sommelier Guild. I love sharing my knowledge of wine with others, especially when accompanied by authentic Italian food. Buon Giorno! I’m Cara. I am from the U.S., but I lived in Rome for 9 years, becoming enamored first with the Eternal City and then with Stefano. I married Stefano, became an Italian citizen, started our family in Rome, and while I was there I learned from family and friends the art of preparing Italian food and of appreciating life Italian style. I unwind in the kitchen, and find pleasure in serving delicious food to friends and family.

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