How to Make Lilac Sugar

Fragrant lilacs are a sure sign of spring. Preserve the blossom for seasons to come in a sugar that is perfect for baking or tea.
By Daniel Valko

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New seasons come and go, but the smells and feelings of spring have always stayed the same. One of them is the amazing smell of lilacs. These little purple flowers grow almost everywhere. And are truly the essential smell of spring. Use that beautiful scent to make amazing sugar for you kitchen cupboards.

Lilac sugar can be used in tea or baking. Or any other creative use you can come up with. I personally love it in a cup of camomile tea.

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Try dusting the sugar on the crust of a blueberry pie, click here for a recipe.

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How to Make Lilac Sugar
 
Fragrant lilacs are a sure sign of spring. Preserve the blossom for seasons to come in a sugar that is perfect for baking or tea. Inspired by Call Me Cupcake.
Author:
Recipe Type: Baking, Tips, Sugar
Ingredients
  • sugar, as much as you'd like
  • lilac petals, as much as you'd like, start with about ½ cup for the size jar pictured
  • jar
Instructions
  1. Making lilac sugar is very easy and simple, just layer the lilac petals in a mason jar. Along with granulated sugar, how much you need will depend on how big your mason jar is. Place the closed jar in a dark dry place.
  2. Every day gently shake the jar to mix the sugar.
  3. After the sugar is dry (this may take about a week or more) sift the sugar using a mesh strainer, to separate the dried lilac petals from the flavored sugar. This may take some time, so use a spoon. Lilac sugar can be used in tea or baking. Or any other creative use you can come up with. I personally love it in a cup of camomile tea.

 

Daniel Valko

Daniel hails from Portland, Oregon and keeps busy baking, cooking, and blogging. Oh, and being a high school senior, too. He blogs on Plentifulplate.com

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6 Comments
  1. I loved you new, fresh idea and can’t wait for our lilacs to bloom again so my husband and I can try this. He is a wonderful chef like you and loves to try inventive things like this. Keep on cooking, your wonderful!!!

  2. I made a batch yesterday and just opened the jar to see how it was smelling. It smells rancid. What did I do wrong?
    Tom

  3. the moisture in the petals makes it rancid if you let them sit more than a couple days at most. i saw on some other sites you have to strain them within 3 days. wasted a lot of sugar with this recipe =(

  4. I do lavender sugar, and I use it in my cheesecake recipe. It adds a really nice but subtle flavor. Lilac would be great for a cheesecake or panna cotta .

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