White Summer Slaw

A note about homemade mayonnaise: it’s easy, and it took me twenty-five years of mayo adoration to discover I’d never buy a jar of it again.
By Jacqui Gabel

White Summer Slaw

The arm you whisk with will pinch a little at the crook of your elbow, but if you keep your eyes on the prize, a gorgeous whip of pale yellow mayonnaise will develop sooner than you can say wheresthefuckinghellmans.

White Summer Slaw
 
Prep Time
Total Time
 
A note about homemade mayonnaise: it’s easy, and it took me twenty-five years of mayo adoration to discover I’d never buy a jar of it again.
Author:
Recipe Type: Side
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 6 cups of shredded white cabbage
  • 1 red onion, sliced
  • handful of chopped fresh cilantro
  • ⅓ cup homemade mayonnaise
  • apple cider vinegar or lemon juice
  • honey
  • salt and pepper
Mayonnaise
  • 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon mustard
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon cold water
  • ¾ cup canola oil or another neutral oil – but not olive, which will make your mayo bitter.
Instructions
Mayo
  1. Whisk together all ingredients except the oil until frothy. Then, add the oil drop by drop while whisking fast. If you add the oil too quickly, your mayonnaise will break – if it does, no big deal. Start over. Once the mayonnaise starts emulsifying and expanding, you can add the oil in a slow, steady stream while continuing to whisk.
Slaw
  1. Mix 6 cups of shredded white cabbage with 1 red onion, sliced. Add a handful of chopped fresh cilantro. Whisk together ⅓ cup homemade mayonnaise with apple cider vinegar or lemon juice, honey, salt, and pepper, all to taste, until it’s as sweet or acidic as you like. Eat straight, or atop pulled pork on a sandwich.

Jacqui Gabel

Jacqui Gabel hails from Minnesota and lives in Seoul. Her motivation to travel stems from a yearning to learn through food, and she is particularly interested in what people eat for breakfast. Jacqui has waitressed, taught kindergarten, designed pantyhose, and sold wine and costume jewelry. Once a week, she visits her friend Hye Rae's Seoul kitchen, and they show each other a thing or two of what they know. If the recipe is Korean, she learned it from Hye Rae. Jacqui loves to cook and feed, and she writes about travel, food, and identity on her blog.

More Posts - Website - Twitter

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Rate Recipe: