Tangy Pickled Eggs

Tangy pickled eggs are a great snack, especially with brews to match. Their bright hue makes for a wonderful spring addition to a table setting and adds a pop of flavor to salads.
By Katherine Sacks

PickledBeets_KatherineSacks

The one and only time I’ve had pickled eggs, we were tucked into the back roads of Traverse City, Michigan, sitting in the most charming barn that doubled as an apple cider tasting room. We had spent the day driving from delicious place to delicious place, tasting wine, cherries, seafood, and many other culinary delights. And although I hadn’t spotted Mario Batali, who spends his summers in the area, I was certainly on a foodie high. Inside the barn, the tasting room offered a variety of ciders, and, I imagine thanks to some Amish influences, the only option for snacking was a bright jar of pickled eggs. Perhaps because of the foodie high—because at the time I was really not a fan of eggs—I decided to order a couple, which we happily ate along with our brews.

I’m not sure if it’s the very fond memories we have for the trip—which was so lovely that I recommend a visit to the area if at all possible—or if the tangy eggs really were delicious, but three years later I still remember the very specific details surrounding our tasting them. And now that I’ve made peace with eggs as a food option. We have a long overnight hike in Brandenburg planned—60 kilometers through the woods surrounding Berlin—and this will be a great snack to bring along.

Tangy Pickled Eggs
 
Tangy pickled eggs are a great snack, especially with brews to match. Their bright hue makes for a wonderful spring addition to a table setting and adds a pop of flavor to salads. adapted from The Kitchn
Author:
Recipe Type: Appetizer
Serves: 12 halves
Ingredients
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 can pickled beets
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • ? cup brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. Gently place eggs in a medium sized pot and cover with cool water. Bring the water to a boil over high heat, then cover pot and remove from heat. Let sit for 10 minutes.
  2. Drain the eggs and place them in an ice water bath for several minutes to cool. Carefully remove shells from eggs, and set aside.
  3. While the eggs are cooking, prepare the brine. In a large glass jar or bowl, combine the can of pickled beats, vinegar, sugar, peppercorns, and salt. Stir together, and then carefully add the hard-boiled eggs.
  4. Cover and let sit for at least 12 hours, or up to 3 days, depending on how strong (and pink) you want the eggs.

Katherine Sacks

Katherine Sacks

Katherine Sacks is a Berlin-based freelance writer and recipe developer specializing in travel, food, lifestyle, and health topics. A graduate of Drexel University’s culinary arts department and Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, Katherine combines seven years of restaurant experience with her reporting and editing background. Her work has appeared in Chicago magazine, the Chicago-Sun Times, and FoodandWine.com, among other publications. She also contributes to culinary trade publication StarChefs.com, Forbes Travel Guide, and Snooth Eats, and blogs at LaVitaCucinare.com.

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