Summer Drinks: Homemade Elderflower Syrup

To many Europeans, refreshing Elderflower drinks are classic symbols of the warm summer months.
Text And Photo By Tamara Novacoviç

Elderflower syrup is commonly made by people throughout much of Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe during these spring/summer months. The syrup is diluted with spring water and used as a drink. It is also combined with soda, white wine, or even beer (you get that cider effect). According to Wikipedia, in the United States the syrup is used to make elderflower marshmallows.

Elderberry tree is in full blossom and its flowers smell lovely. Just imagine that flavorful taste of its syrup. Elderflowers can be used in many different ways-for making wine, tea, liqueurs, cakes. People even fry it in breadcrumbs-this is actually a big hit in many restaurants worldwide and is served as a dessert or sweet lunch with a sugar and cinnamon topping.

This syrup is the perfect company to heavier barbecue dishes but also refreshing salads. Just add some ice to it and you’ll be in heaven.

If you happen to come across and find elderberry tree, make sure to pick up some flowers and make this refreshing drink. Just make sure you pick up flowers in as clean nature as possible, further away from industry and roads. This is actually quite simple to make. The recipe is my mom’s and this syrup is made in our household every season.

Elderflower juice
 
Refreshing drink perfect for summer months and barbecue season!
Author:
Recipe Type: Drink
Ingredients
  • 30 elderflower blossoms, washed
  • 12.5 cups (3 l) water
  • 15.5 cups (3 kg) sugar
  • 2.8 oz (80 g) citric acid
Instructions
  1. Sink clean flowers into 3 litres of water and leave covered for 24 h. The next day, strain it through a fine (dense) sieve or cloth. Discard the flowers and take the juice.
  2. Now simply add 3 kg sugar and 80 g citric acid to it and stir until everything dissolves. Pour into sterilized glass bottles and keep in fridge. You need to keep it in your fridge, because no conservans is used.
  3. Some versions cook the juice with sugar until it boils, remove from heat, let cool a bit and then add citric acid. This way the syrup will last a bit longer, but trust me-you'll run out of it quite fast, it's delicious!
Tamara Novakoviç

Tamara Novakoviç

Tamara Novakovic is a passionate self-taught cook, food blogger, freelance food writer and photographer behind bite-my-cake.blogspot.com. Her life journey has led her through Faculty of Humanities in Zagreb, Croatia to discovering passion for making cakes. She is currently a weekly food columnist for Croatian newspaper V magazine and food magazine Repete.

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