Squash and Tahini Tofu Bowl

Delicata squash, tahini, sorghum, and chard make this a bold tofu bowl packed with fun flavors. A perfect autumn dish with plenty of nutrients.
By Emily Watson

Squash and Tahini Tofu Bowl

Have you ever heard of sorghum? If not, not to worry. You are probably not alone. I had read about sorghum in some magazine several months ago and waited to get my hands on a bag when it went on sale. Well I finally snagged a bag, and I feel like this recipe really accentuates all of its wonderfully delicious qualities.

So what is it? It is a round grass reminiscent in shape of Israeli couscous, the fat couscous you may have come across (Moroccan couscous is itty bitty), but it has a little black dot on each kernel, hence the eyeball comparison. It is native to Africa and has the most delightful chewy texture and subtle sweetness. Maybe you have heard of sorghum molasses? It is also high in fiber and iron, making it even more worth incorporating into your diet. Sorghum does take a little while to cook- about 50 minutes in fact- so if you are short on time, you can substitute another grain of your choice as the base or even use Israeli couscous.

The slight sweetness of the sorghum pairs beautifully with the earthy chard and delicata squash and the slightly sweet but nutty tahini tofu. This bowl provides a rainbow of colors and textures, so it is super satisfying. The ingredients can be doubled or even tripled because it makes delicious leftovers.

Squash and Tahini Tofu Bowl

Find the recipe for the tahini glaze for the tofu here.

 

Squash and Tahini Tofu Bowl
 
Delicata squash, tahini, sorghum, and chard make this a bold tofu bowl packed with fun flavors. A perfect autumn dish with plenty of nutrients.
Author:
Recipe Type: Main
Ingredients
  • 1 cup sorghum
  • 2½ cups water
  • 1 delicata squash, washed, seeds removed, and sliced into ¼-inch half-moons
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil + 1 tablespoon
  • 1 recipe Tahini Tofu (recipe link above)
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard (I used rainbow, but any type will do)
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2-3 tablespoons tahini, for drizzling (I like Philly's local Soom tahini because it is so wonderfully nutty)
Instructions
  1. Cook sorghum. Combine sorghum and water in a pot. Bring to a boil over high-heat. Reduce heat to low and cover, and allow sorghum to cook for 50 minutes. After 50 minutes, keep covered and remove from heat and allow to rest for about 10 minutes. Remove lid, stir, drain any excess water, and then sprinkle with a pinch or two of salt, and set aside.
  2. Roast squash. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss squash with two teaspoons olive oil and salt. Roast in single layer for 25 minutes or until squash is tender and beginning to brown.**You can also bake the tofu as the squash is cooking**
  3. Prepare Swiss chard. Wash and loosely dry chard. It is okay if some water lingers on the leaves. Remove the stems from the chard leaves, and finely chop. Roll the leaves into a cylinder and cut into ½-inch ribbons like you were going to chiffonade basil. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium-high heat. Add chopped chard stems and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add sliced chard leaves, a generous pinch of salt, and stir. Cook until chard wilts and is tender, about 6-8 minutes, tossing occasionally. Add red wine vinegar, stir, and then remove pan from heat. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside when done.
  4. Assemble the bowls. Use a few scoops of sorghum as the base and top with roasted squash, sauteed chard, tahini tofu, and a drizzle of tahini. Enjoy! Serves 3-4.

 

Emily Watson

Emily Watson is the blogger and recipe developer behind the blog, Nourishing Matters. She is on a mission to make whole foods delicious. Emily is also a yoga instructor and enjoys helping students cultivate that balance between effort and ease. She majored in Romance Languages at Dartmouth College, and her travels abroad continue to inspire her in the kitchen. She lives in Philadelphia and loves exploring the ever-changing local food scene.

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