How to Make Crème Fraîche at Home

Crème fraîche is so delicious to make yourself and is delectable with fresh fruit or as a topping for cakes or pies. From apple pie to taco night, your homemade stash will come in handy.
By Maya Parson

Homemade crème fraîche with strawberries

Homemade crème fraîche is delectable with fresh fruit or as a topping for cakes or pies. It is also excellent as an ingredient or finishing touch for savory dishes like eggs, soups, and even tacos.

Once you’ve made your first jar of homemade crème fraîche you may find yourself in an existential crisis of sorts: How did you not know this was possible? How have you lived without it all these years?

Crème fraîche

Crème fraîche, despite its name, is closer to sour cream than whipped cream. Personally, I think its more delicious than either one!

You may also find yourself sneaking into the kitchen for a spoonful and dolloping it on everything from tacos (it’s like sour cream, but better) to eggs to soup to apple crisp. I’ll be the first to admit that I keep a jar of crème fraîche in my fridge at all times.

Homemade Crème Fraîche
 
Homemade crème fraîche is so easy that anyone can make it. Simply add a bit of cultured buttermilk to fresh cream and let it sit out at room temperature until the cream thickens from the lactic acid in the buttermilk. That's it. The result: thick and delicious crème fraîche that is better (and far less expensive) than anything you can buy in your fancy gourmet market. Note: I like my crème fraîche best when made with cream that is not ultra-pasturized, but it can be challenging to find. If possible, buy cream from a local dairy that does not ultra-pasturize its products. If you do use ultra-pasturized cream, don't worry. It will still be irresistable.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 cup whipping cream
  • 1 Tablespoon cultured buttermilk
Instructions
  1. Mix cream and buttermilk in a glass container. Cover and leave out on your counter until thickened (approximately 8 hours, but time will vary depending on room temperature). Refrigerate when desired consistency (a bit thicker than sour cream) is achieved.

 

Maya Parson

Maya Parson

Maya Parson entered the world of food journalism as an ice cream taste tester for her local newspaper at age eight. She later pursued a career in cultural anthropology – happily feasting on farm cheeses, fresh corn tortillas and a lot of rice and beans during her field research in Central America. Maya eventually settled in the other “central America” – the U.S. Midwest – where she enjoys cooking with farm-fresh foods and writing about food, culture and the culinary arts. She is the editor of Edible Michiana Magazine and can also be found on her blog, Cultured Grub.

More Posts - Website

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Rate Recipe: