Charred Ramp with Ricotta on Toast

While many mark spring by the first blossoms of crocuses and daffodils, for me it has always been the season of weird, wild, green things. From sorrel to green garlic, lambs quarters to fava beans, indulge in spring’s catwalk of here-then-gone harvests.

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Processed with VSCOcam with s5 preset

That elusive “catch me while you can” quality certainly makes this time of year feel special, but it can also be incredibly frustrating as a cook. When all your favorite ingredients are rushing in and back out in a flurry, it’s hard not to focus on pickling and preserving—instead of just plain enjoying what the season has to offer.

So this is my zen, in-the-moment recipe idea for spring. It’s a chance to just make the most of wild greens while they last, to eat them all in one indulgent go. And frankly, “recipe” is a strong word for it: get a grill pan, fire it up, make things taste good. That said, it’s a strong contender for the best thing I’ve ever cooked.

Charred Ramp with Ricotta on Toast
 
Author:
Recipe Type: Breakfast, Snack, Appetizer
Ingredients
  • 3-4 thick slices of crusty bread
  • A dozen ramp leaves (the stems are great for pickling)
  • Roughly 3 tablespoons of ricotta or labne
  • Good olive oil
  • Maldon salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat a cast iron stovetop grill or grill pan over medium high heat.
  2. Lightly brush the grill with oil, then char your bread somewhat aggressively.
  3. Remove your bread from the grill and top with ricotta or labne.
  4. Lightly toss your ramp tops in oil and grill for thirty seconds (or until they begin to wilt).
  5. Top your toast with the grilled ramps. Sprinkle with Maldon salt and drizzle with more olive oil.
  6. Turn off the TV, put your magazine away and enjoy without distraction. Spring is sacred, so enjoy every bite.

 

Carly DeFilippo

Carly DeFilippo

Carly is a Contributing Writer at Honest Cooking. Though the first line of her college application essay was "I love tunafish," it wasn't until she pursued graduate studies in Paris that she ever considered a future in food. Based in Manhattan, Carly is a freelance writer and the co-founder of Cognoscenti Creative, a boutique branding agency dedicated to establishing artisans as influencers.

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